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Sell With a Story: Black Rose-Cut Diamonds

SWAS Black Rose Cut Diamonds

Black diamonds are back in fashion. So are rose-cut stones. And when you put them together, you have a distinctive combination that lends itself to custom designs. Black rose-cut diamonds offer customers a look that stands out from the crowd as sophisticated, personal, and elegant.  I’m all about big and sparkly, but not every customer feels that way. Many prefer a subtler, understated look that intrigues the eye. Also, women who lead active lives appreciate a rose-cut’s low profile.  

What’s Old is New

Over the last twenty years, millennials and Gen Zs have increasingly embraced vintage looks, and along with this, vintage-inspired jewelry styles have enjoyed a renaissance. These designs feature delicate beading, milgrain, filigree accents, and more. It wasn’t long before customers wanted to make their looks more authentic with distinctive rose-cut diamonds. And black diamonds? Absolutely.  

Unfolding Petals

The rose-cut originated in India around 1520. Later that century, when the rose-cut reached Venice — already a gemstone cutting hub — the city’s stone cutters used newly developed tools to refine its faceting. It reached its peak of popularity during the Georgian and Victorian eras (roughly 1754 to 1900). Round rose-cut diamonds have 24 triangular facets that suggest an unfolding rose, which explains its name. The stone has a faceted, domed top and a flat or slightly rounded bottom.

Ultra-Chic

Remember the “little black dress” — a woman’s go-to favorite for business and celebrations? A rose-cut black diamond ring, pendant, earrings, or all three, carries the same panache. They make fabulous studs or drop earrings, suit many different ring styles, and add allure when set in a pendant or necklace center. For a dramatic look, surround them with a colorless diamond halo.  

Say “Yes”

Rose-cut black diamonds are perfect for an engagement ring, a trendy look, or a classic with a twist. Who would choose one? A fashion-forward customer who embraces her own sense of style, constantly seeking the unexpected. Or she could be a customer who wants to create a vintage design down to the smallest detail. Or perhaps she’s a customer who finds a rose-cut black diamond ring irresistible. Have one in your case, and you’ll be surprised by who it will attract.   

Mr. Big Gives Carrie the New Black

For you fans of Sex and the City, you know what I’m talking about. It happens near the end of the second movie when Big gives Carrie Bradshaw a fabulous five-carat black diamond ring. (Some people call it an engagement ring, but it’s actually their first anniversary!) And why did he choose the black diamond? His famous answer: “Because you are not like anyone else.” Doesn’t every woman want to hear that?  Though black diamonds had long established themselves as an homage to vintage style, Carrie’s ring — designed by Itay Malkin — has clean, modern lines made romantic by the contrast of the black center stone with the colorless gold and melee diamonds. If we needed any proof, this made it clear: black diamonds look gorgeous set in whatever style pleases your customer.



An Enduring Symbol

Whatever reason your customer chooses a rose-cut black diamond, the stone has potent symbolism. Like colorless diamonds, black diamonds embody love, fidelity, and eternity. But black diamonds go beyond that, symbolizing power, charisma, certainty, and passion. I think most women will love these meanings. 




Sell With a Story: Earth to Market™ Gemstones

What Are Earth to Market Gems? 

Stuller’s Earth to Market gemstones are gemstones of known origin, a significant initiative for us. We have undertaken it because it’s good for you, our customers, good for your customers who will increasingly want this information, and good for the industry. 

Benefits of Earth to Market Gems 

  • Help tell the story of that individual gemstone from its earthly origin to the wearer’s jewelry. 
  • Share the compelling story of small gemstone mines that leave a minimal environmental footprint. 
  • Support small-scale mining and jobs for individuals, families, and communities with no other means of livelihood. 
  • Available in Stuller Notable Gems™ selection and calibrated stones. 

So Many Hands 

For thousands of years, most gemstones reached major markets after passing through innumerable hands. This made it near impossible to know the original source of a stone. To demonstrate what we mean, let’s think back to the famed Silk Road, an ancient series of trade routes linking China’s extraordinary wealth of goods to Middle Eastern and European markets.  

Risk Takers 

Traders and merchants took significant risks while crossing Asia’s vast, remote regions. They contended with attacks, disease, and even death. Today we might call them thrill-seekers or adventurers — but not entirely. They traveled in large groups and relied on their knowledge and the local contacts they had made on previous trips. And few traveled the whole distance — quite literally, many thousands of miles.  

Moving Forward 

Caravans would go only so far, then trade and sell their wares to other traders to acquire goods they could sell on their way back home. The new caravan would move west with their caravans of donkeys, horses, camels, and yaks burdened with China’s finest silks, jade sculptures, porcelain, paper (invented by the Chinese), gemstones from Asia’s rivers and mountains, and much more. 

En route, the merchants would buy or trade for more prized treasures. In the region we now call Afghanistan, they sought highly desirable lapis lazuli, aquamarine, and more. They looked for exquisite Persian turquoise, Egyptian emeralds, topaz, and peridots in Middle Eastern markets. They were anticipating their arrival in Venice, the most powerful Western trading market in the Middle Ages. Who knows how many hands the gemstones passed through to reach this destination and the people who purchased the gems. It’s impossible to count.  

Even today, gemstones from all over Asia mingle in Bangkok and and other gemstone hubs, making it hard to say anything more than “origin assumed.” Many of these gems are cut and polished in Bangkok then move on to other places around the globe and large wholesalers. Fortunately, we have our own office in Bangkok, and our on-site buyers and graders keep a close eye on what they purchase and its origin story.  

Our gemstone buyers and product directors travel more than 250,000 miles per year sourcing stones and visiting stone sources and operations, ensuring they follow our strict ethical standards

Rewards 

By offering your customers our Earth to Market gemstones, you have the opportunity to share an ethically and environmentally friendly story and make them a vital part of it. You can be sure they’ll share the story with friends, and you’ll get more business as a result. 

Learn more at Stuller.com/EarthToMarket.


See more features from the world of gemstones by viewing our recent Sell With a Story blog posts!

Ultimate Gray + Illuminating: Colors of the Year

Color Pairings That Pop

All Things Green

Moissanite




Sell With a Story: Moissanite

From the Stars: The History of Moissanite

In 1893, French chemist Henri Moissan was examining rock samples in Canyon Diablo, Arizona. Peering inside a meteor crater, he came across a bevy of sparkling stones and mistakenly identified them as diamonds.

They weren’t.

These crystals were silicon carbide — aka, Moissanite. And Moissan actually wasn’t the first person to encounter Moissanite.

Enter: Edward Acheson

American chemist Edward G. Acheson successfully created silicon carbide in a lab in 1891. He pioneered the Acheson process, a process used to create silicon carbide. Similarly to Henri Moissan, Acheson also had a slight blunder: he was attempting to synthesize diamonds but instead created blue crystals of silicon carbide.

It wouldn’t be until 1904 that Acheson and Moissan would realize they were looking at the same mineral.

And although Acheson was first to the silicon carbide punch, Moissanite was named in honor of Henri Moissan.

Moissanite Fine Jewelry Trends Rose Cut Gemstones

Why Choose Lab-Created Moissanite?

In its natural form, Moissanite remains exceptionally rare, coming only from meteorites that strike Earth’s upper mantle. In fact, after Moissan’s discovery, no natural Moissanite was found until 1958 — this time in Wyoming. It’s because of this rarity in nature that humans decided to grow them in a lab, making Moissanite available for everyone — for both industrial uses and for jewelry purposes.

When used in jewelry, lab-created Moissanite has unmatched brilliance that sparkles from across the room. Its attractive price point adds to its dazzling impact, making any jewelry dream a reality.

Here are a few reasons to choose lab-created Moissanite for your engagement ring, body jewelry, or fine fashion jewelry:

  • Lab-created Moissanite is affordable
    • Because scientists have perfected the growing process, lab-created Moissanite is incredibly affordable. Carat for carat, your customers can get a larger Moissanite at a significantly lower price than a diamond of the same size. For couples with a limited budget, this lets them get the center stone they want with no sacrifice on size, clarity, cut, or color.
  • Lab-created Moissanite lasts a lifetime
    • It’s a 9.25 on the Mohs Scale, which means Moissanite has a high tolerance to being scratched. It’s harder than even sapphire and ruby, which rank at 9. Moissanite is also exceptionally durable — or, in geological terminology, tough. This refers to the fact Moissanite doesn’t chip, break, or fracture easily.
  • Lab-created Moissanite has some serious sparkle — more than even diamonds!
    • With its double refraction and radiant rainbow fire, this lively, durable gem offers each customer the exciting opportunity to wear sparks of rainbow fire in earrings, rings, body chains, anklets, and more.
  • Nothing gets wasted in the growing process
    • Non-gem-quality Moissanite is used in computer chips and motherboards.

Why Choose Stuller for Lab-Created Moissanite?

When you buy lab-created Moissanite from Stuller, you get a variety of benefits. Here are five reasons why Stuller is your go-to supplier for any Moissanite need:

NEW: 5 fancy color options

In Stuller Lab-Created Moissanite™, you have five affordable, vibrant color options:

  • Fancy green
  • Fancy blue
  • Fancy yellow
  • Fancy brown
  • Black

Our colored lab-created Moissanite is never coated. The color you see is the color they were grown to be.

In-stock and ready to ship

With our inventory of over one million gemstones held on-site and ready to ship, you can choose a stone on our site today and have it in your hand tomorrow.

Sizes range from 1mm to 12.5mm

If you need a larger size, special cut, or anything else, our Special Order Services team is always ready to find it for you. With more than 10,000 gemstones procured each year, they know what it takes, where to go, and who to call to find exactly what you need.

Two luxurious brands

We offer two brands, both of which are eye clean, loupe clean, and affordable: Stuller Lab-Created Moissanite and Charles & Colvard.

  1. Stuller Lab-Created Moissanite™
  • Available in two color grades: DEF colorless and GH near-colorless
  • Best for customers who want to get maximum sparkle for their budget
  • Has a variety of fancy-colored options: blue, green, brown, yellow, and black
  1. Charles & Colvard Forever One® Moissanite
  • Available in two color grades: DEF colorless and GHI near-colorless
  • Best for customers who want the traditional name in lab-created Moissanite
  • Comes with a limited lifetime warranty
  • Available in Old European cuts

An abundance of shapes and cuts

Our selection has 14 shapes and even more cuts, including on-trend and classic options, such as rose-cut stones.

moissanite shapes

Ready to discover all lab-created Moissanite has to offer? Head over to our website today to get started!


Fascinated by all things gemstones? Check out our recent Sell With a Story blog posts!

All Things Green

Color Pairings That Pop

Aquamarine




Sell With a Story: All Things Green

Is it really March already? The calendar says so, and that can only mean we Northern Hemisphere dwellers will soon be welcoming in spring and packing up our winter wardrobes. But March means more than just spring — it also means St. Patrick’s Day is on the way!

Wednesday, March 17, marks this year’s celebration, and we’ve got just what you need to invite good fortune AND to wear something green to protect yourself from being unwittingly pinched.

The Luck of the Irish

To kick off your social-distanced St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, we’re highlighting five gemstones that will have you and your customers green with envy. We suggest getting your hands on these gems as soon as possible so that you can enjoy the luck of the Irish all March long.

1. Fancy Green Moissanite

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, our gemstone team is THRILLED to introduce a most fitting gem: fancy green Stuller Lab-Created Moissanite™ (in addition to four other new fancy colors).

Offering both a lush green hue with the intense sparkle that is Moissanite’s claim to fame, our green Lab-Created Moissanite is perfect for any green aficionado. Share these cool facts about Moissanite to let them know you’re their gemstone expert for any need:

  • This stone was discovered in an Arizona meteorite crater, but all Moissanite used in jewelry today is created in a lab
  • Ranking at 9.25 on the Mohs Scale, Moissanite is harder than ruby and sapphire — and strong enough for daily wear in engagement rings, fashion styles, and body jewelry alike
  • Moissanite has more than twice as much sparkle as diamonds due to its unique refractive properties
  • Scientifically known as silicon carbide, Moissanite is used in computer motherboards
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Stay tuned for next month’s Sell With a Story, where we’ll do a deep dive into everything about Lab-Created Moissanite: its history, our two brands, Stuller’s five fancy colors, and even a new video showcasing why Moissanite is so marvelous.

In the meantime, you can shop our colored Lab-Created Moissanite here or learn more about the benefits of this wonderful gem.

2. Emerald

Ranging in hue from a warm yellow-green to a cool blue-green, it’s no surprise we embrace emerald for those born in May, the height of spring. As one of the Big Three gemstones, emerald has endured in popularity for centuries, being THE go-to gemstone for all things green.

Of course, there’s a variety of green gems available today, but for customers who want the traditional green gem, emerald is the only choice. Just be sure to treat it with care since these gems can be finicky and fragile to work with.

  • The name emerald finds its root in the Sanskrit word marakata, meaning the green of growing things
  • Due to its lush, rolling countryside, Ireland is famously known as the Emerald Isle
  • Emeralds and emerald jewelry are the gifts for the 35th wedding anniversary
  • The world’s largest emerald is a privately owned 7,052-carat uncut crystal from Colombia
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Take a deep dive into the verdant beauty and history of emerald at Sell With a Story: Emerald Gemstones, or find your perfect stone in our calibrated assortment or Notable Gems®.

3. Demantoid Garnet

Garnet comes in a wide range of richly hued shades that are both reasonably priced and readily available. But as with all stones, there are select types that are superstars. In garnet, that standout superstar stone is the Demantoid variety.

Getting its eye-popping color from trace amounts of chromium and ferric iron, this lime-green gem has one thing that makes it outshine the rest of the garnet family: Demantoid garnet has incredible fire dispersion — more so than diamonds!

  • Demantoid, meaning diamond-like, comes from the old German word demant
  • The highest quality gems come from Russia’s Ural Mountains, where it was discovered in 1853
  • Faceted stones above two carats are rare, and most are under one carat
  • Some have beautiful, unique golden horsetail inclusions — which make them even more valuable
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You can find Demantoid garnet in Stuller Notable Gems®.

4. Tsavorite Garnet

Meet the other green giant of the garnet family: Tsavorite. This vivid grass-green gemstone gets its color from the element vanadium, although some Tsavorite garnets contain other elements that give their exceptional color a whisper of blue.

Tsavorite has a long, rich history that starts with its 1961 discovery — which you can read all about in our in-depth analysis at Sell With a Story: Tsavorite Garnet.

  • Tsavorite is an excellent, more durable birthstone option for May babies who shy away from their traditional emerald
  • Tsavorite’s name comes from Kenya’s Tsavo National Park
  • The finest quality Tsavorite hails from a deposit in Kenya’s Kuranze region
  • Most Tsavorite is natural and untreated, so the stone you receive looks exactly how it came out of the ground, offering the raw beauty of Mother Nature to customers
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We offer calibrated Tsavorite garnet in a variety of shapes, sizes, and vibrant color qualities as well as in our Notable Gems® collection.

5. Peridot

Also called the Evening Emerald, peridot is a radiant green with a hint of gold. This lush hue embodies true splendor and growth. While best known as the birthstone for August babies, anyone can enjoy peridot’s unique shade — and indeed, people are enjoying it, as peridot has been trending in a huge way recently.

If you have a customer who loves peridot for what it is, let them know that birthstones aren’t limited only to those born in a specific month. Anyone can enjoy this lovely bright green, perfect for both a spring celebration of St. Patrick’s Day and for sweltering summer days spent poolside.

  • Peridot is the gift for the 16th wedding anniversary
  • Why pear-a-doe and not pear-a-dot? Peridot was first mined in the town of Peridot, Arizona
  • Peridot is one of few gemstones that appears in exactly one color: a perfect pistachio panache
  • The oldest peridot gemstones came to Earth in a meteorite, and they’re 4.5 billion years old — a far cry from the meager millions of years of Earth-forged Peridot
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Check out Sell With a Story: Peridot Gemstones to learn more, or stock up in our calibrated collection.

More Things Green

Are you feeling the luck of the Irish (or perhaps even envy) yet? If not, check out these previous Sell With a Story blogs about some lesser-known green gemstones:


Many Needs, One Source: Stuller Gemstones™

Whether you need to shop gemstones by color, find a perfect match, or have a team of gemstone experts embark on a worldwide treasure hunt to find a very specific gemstone, Stuller has you covered.

With more than one million gemstones in our inventory and our next-day delivery on all in-stock products, we can get you what you need, when you need it — with the spectacular customer service for which we’re known.

Not sure where to get started?

Check out Stuller Gemstones™ today!




Sell With a Story: Color Pairings That Pop

Think back to the stones that have dominated jewelry center pieces for years past. If you’re like many, you probably immediately thought of the big four stones: diamonds, sapphires, emeralds, and rubies. No one can deny their beauty, but as customers’ tastes evolved, beauty alone isn’t enough.

They want something else. Something with a story. Something no one else has.

One way in which we’ve seen customers exploring this desire for uniqueness is with gemstone combinations that range from bold jewel tones that give the wearer confidence to sunny color unions that invite happiness.

Take it Back to the 1920s

Back in the 1920s, Cartier unveiled a bracelet that utilized an unusual color combination: green, red, blue, and white. Of course, those four colors came from the big four stones themselves — emeralds, rubies, sapphires, and a dash of diamonds — and thus a luxurious line of jewelry was born. Later on, these designs came to be known as Tutti Frutti.

While these shades seem to conflict with one another, Pierre Cartier was clearly onto something: the popularity of this combination has endured in the approximate 100 years that have passed since Tutti Frutti’s introduction. And with the record-breaking $1,300,000 sale of one of these bracelets at Sotheby’s last year, gem-intensive styles have enjoyed a renewed cultural relevance and fanbase.

The 2020 return of Tutti Frutti has opened the door for unique color pairings — and the more they pop, the better.

Blue and Orange

Bright, ornamental designs are trending in a huge way, especially when they combine a matte, opaque stone sitting in contrast beside a translucent faceted gem. Lapis lazuli, malachite, onyx, coral, and turquoise are but a few of the gems that are up for the task.

One of my favorite pairings is in the above image, where the complementary combination of blue and orange lends itself to a striking story of fire and ice.

While you can use a deep blue sapphire for this combination, how about swapping that deep blue gem for the soft blue of turquoise? Mixing textures is a visually interesting way to kick up the fun of any design.

For example, let a faceted orange stone (I suggest the ever-beautiful spessartite garnet) take center stage, and have a halo of turquoise frame it. Accent these designs with a sprinkle of white diamonds, and the result will be a seriously eye-catching design. The contrasting texture of opaque against faceted is one we absolutely adore — and your customers will too!

Pink, Green, and Teal

For younger customers who want to break away from the rubies, emeralds, and sapphires that their grandparents wore, a combination of pink spinel, teal tourmaline, and mint green garnet may strike their fancy.

This tropical combination is a contemporary take on classic red/green/blue designs yet still offers customers an effortless piece they can wear with any outfit. Try experimenting with the balance of colors to see what you like best. The size of the stones, the shapes you use, the metal quality, and so much more give you endless ways to play with this combination.

Of course, you can always try swapping out one of these gemstone colors for another of the same hue or vibrance. For example, what if the pink spinel not working for you? Maybe a yellow sapphire will do the trick.

Explore the Rainbow: Shop Gemstones by Color

This trend toward bright colors is sure to continue and will become the foundation of many custom masterpieces to come. To help you play a part in these future masterpieces, Stuller is here for you.

With more than 105 gemstone types, you’re sure to find what you need — especially because we’ve made it so easy with one key feature on our website. When you need some color inspiration, the Shop by Color feature on Stuller’s website can help you find the perfect shade.

How it works is quick and easy:

  1. Choose calibrated faceted, calibrated cabochon, or Notable Gems®.
  2. Pick your desired color or color range — select one or many!
  3. Browse available shapes and sizes for your selection(s).
  4. Toggle any additional specifics: origin, color quality, unique features, and more.

Stuller is Your Gemstone Source

Presenting your customers with relevant color choices positions you as the trend expert. And with Stuller in your back pocket, you can quickly and easily get everything you need to cement their trust in you.

  • We keep an on-site, in-stock inventory of more than one million gemstones that are ready for next-day delivery.
  • To remain close to operations and stay current with industry trends, we maintain a facility in Bangkok, Thailand.
  • Our buyers travel more than 250,000 each year to procure the stones in our vaults and to visit suppliers, cutters, and miners.
  • We have trained gemological experts on standby when you would like firsthand information about a specific gemstone in our inventory.

From the calibrated gems you rely upon to completely unique individual stones, we can support you and your customers in finding the perfect center piece or suite of stones for any special project.


Read more articles about Stuller’s gemstone offering and find exactly what’s right for you.

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Sell With a Story: Beyond the Yellow Brick Road

gold-recovery-header

As a child watching The Wizard of Oz in years, I was too mesmerized by the wonder of Dorothy finding herself in a magical new world to take in all the details. Emerald City? That I understood. Ditto for her Ruby Slippers. But yellow bricks? Only years later, watching the movie for the who-knows-how-many-times, did I realize that the bricks were gold. Ah, looking back, it’s clear the yellow brick road didn’t just lead to the Emerald City. It was priceless in its own right — the ultimate symbol of luxury, the substance of dreams.

Cal Brockman Goldmark Jewelers Portland Oregon Benchwork

Goldrush

Dorothy was far from the only person to follow a golden road. Throughout history, gold discoveries have launched rushes across continents, up towering mountains, or distant streams and rivers. When we look at Renaissance portraits of current fashion magazines, we see gold everywhere — particularly yellow. Most people can tell you they love gold — whether yellow, white, or rose — and why, but few know much about its long, illustrious history.

Walk Back Along the Yellow Brick Road 

We all know the vital role gold plays in the jewelry industry, but did you know our hominid ancestors — perhaps Neanderthals — discovered gold 40,000 years ago? This came to light when anthropologists and archaeologists studied ancient artifacts and paintings in Spanish caves, dating these treasures back 40 millennia. Among them, they discovered small gold nuggets. This rich yellow metal no doubt mesmerized those who first laid eyes on it as it has ever since.

In Days Long Past

In 5000 BCE, the Egyptians used electrum, a naturally occurring alloy of gold and silver ore, to make jewelry for both men and women. By 3000 BCE, gold jewelry appeared among the ancient Sumerians in Mesopotamia. In 2600 BCE, this same region produced the earliest example of lost wax casting, a funerary decoration for a long-ago queen. By 2500 BCE, gold chains emerged in the Sumerian city of Ur. And at this same time, the Egyptians discovered a wealth of techniques: filigree, granulation embossing, chasing, inlaying, molding, and engraving. South America’s Chavin culture used these techniques by 1200 BCE.

A Death Mask

Gold “death masks” originated in Ancient Egypt, where they believed the mask would help the deceased find their body in the afterlife. The most famous of these is King Tutankhamun. In the 18th century, a gold death mask was discovered in a mining shaft in southwestern Greece, known as Mycenae. Even though the mask pre-dated the Trojan War by 400 years, it was named the Mask of Agamemnon.

Did He Exist?

Agamemnon, the King of Ancient Mycenae, may or may not have lived outside Greek mythology, tragedies, and Homer’s Illiad. In mythology, he led the Greek army to the Trojan Wars, accompanying his brother Menelaus, Helen of Troy’s husband. But we have yet to make a specific match to a historical figure. The lesson learned? Mycenae was believed to be rich in gold. The mask and numerous decorative gold items discovered there indicate this was true.

Castaway

The Nazca civilization near the Peruvian coast perfected lost-wax casting around 500 BCE. This should come as no surprise because South America was rich in gold and silver, and a number of its ancient societies were highly sophisticated. 

Does the Sun Cry?

South America’s great Inca civilization believed it did. They considered gold as the “tears of the sun.” Can you imagine a more beautiful description? If so, please share it below. For me, this gorgeous image does justice to the precious metals, almost unearthly beauty.

Dorothy Got It Right

Between the Emerald City and the Ruby slippers, Dorothy knew how to pick the perfect gems to pair with gold. Centuries ago, when miners in Burma’s Mogok Valley discovered Pigeon Blood Ruby, the king had it set in 24K gold starting a tradition. Pigeon Blood — the finest shade of Ruby — has blue/purple undertones and the brilliant yellow of 24K cancels them out. This creates a peerless, vivid red, one of the most challenging shades to achieve.

Similarly with Emerald, high karat yellow gold enlivens Emerald’s brilliant green displaying it in its full glory. 

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Yellow gold also works magically with Alexandrite, Garnet, Pearl, Amethyst, and Sapphire.

2019 Bridal Engagement Ring Trends Yellow Gold Cushion Garnet Accented Ring
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Forever and Ever

I’m skipping over a long period from the Middle Ages through to the present. I’ll have to write another blog focusing on those lustrous years. Today we use gold for everyday jewelry, custom designs, sophisticated showstoppers, cocktail rings, and so much more. 

Perhaps the biggest gold category is bridal — engagements, anniversary and eternity bands, and wedding bands. It makes perfect sense. Because gold doesn’t corrode, ancient cultures considered it “immortal” — like the love a couple vows to live. We say, “till death do us part,” but love lives on in the hearts of all those whose lives the couple touches — forever and ever.


To learn more about Stuller’s precious metal offerings, visit our website!

If you enjoyed this historical look at gold, view some more of our Sell With A Story blog posts.

Sell With A Story: Aquamarine

Sell With A Story: Diamond History

Sell With A Story: How Are Pearls Formed?




Sell With a Story: Aquamarine

Aquamarine has long been considered a divisive stone; you either love them or love to hate them. With its unique color — non-replicable in nature — Aquamarine could be the enigma we all seek.

aquamarine
Shop Aquamarine in our Notable Gems™

Historical Background

Adopted as March’s birthstone in 1912, Aquamarine has had varied uses throughout the centuries. Two thousand years ago, Emperor Nero used thin slices of Aquamarine to aide in his poor vision. Fast forward to the 1450s. The Germans, famous for precision gemstone cutting, used thin slices to create the optics they needed to cut gems and developed the earliest eyeglasses. The Germans called ‘eyeglass/glasses’ die brille, and many thought this name came from the mineral beryl.

By 1550, the Spanish believed that Aquamarine directly related to the fountain of youth based on stories passed from the Egyptians on down to Ponce de Leon who happened to be a great storyteller. Perhaps it was because this gemstone has long been thought of as a stone of the sea, protecting sailors under Neptune’s watchful eye. No matter which fabled tale engages you, Aquamarine conjures great appreciation from many.

As a Beryl family member, which includes gorgeous green emeralds and pink morganites, Aquamarine comes in soft blue and greenish-blue shades. Categorized as a type 1 stone, most Aquamarine are eye-clean which is important because its tonality and saturation reveal even the smallest inclusions, lowering its value.

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Shop Aquamarine in our calibrated offering

Heat-Treated vs. Non-Heat-Treated Aquamarine

Historically, the jewelry industry has two camps regarding the value of heat-treated Aquamarine — those believing the treatment lessens the stone’s value, and those who think it increases a stone’s value. Let’s explore both. 

First, it’s important to point out that most Aquamarine are heat-treated. It’s considerably more challenging to find un-treated stones, although a prolific hoard coming from Brazil will make it easier. These new stones have colors and clarities that need no help. 

Those who prefer a greenish aquamarine will generally find it in the “treated has less value” camp. Heating Aquamarine does not tend to change the color, but it minimizes impurities that cause the greenish hue, leaving behind a pure, crystal clear pastel blue. Those preferring this easy to identify blue believe that heating increases value. Neither camp is wrong; it merely reflects a difference of opinion. But identifying your camp will help you sell these subtle gemstones.

Selling Aquamarine

Letting a customer know that a stone is heated right up front, that it is an industry-wide practice and is irreversible, can help you gain credibility – not all jewelers disclose this treatment.  It also allows you to look and feel like the expert as you explain that removing stone impurities reduces the underlying greenish colors making the stone the much desired sky-blue.

The same holds true for letting a customer know that the Aquamarine they prefer is an unheated natural gem with its color just as the Earth produced it. It would not hurt to add that due to the rarity of un-heated stones (remember, heating is standard practice), a beautiful natural aquamarine’s value can go up. Also, explain what impurities exist in Aquamarine. Vanadium, one such impurity, has an intense teal color that not only increases the value but also can give the Aquamarine the passing look of a Paraiba, a color well suited to current trends.

The Value of Aquamarine

No matter the camp you reside in, understanding the why behind a gemstone’s value can help you sell in the way that makes the most sense for you and your associates.

If you need help understanding more about the stones we offer within Stuller Gemstones™, please reach out to our experts. We are happiest when helping you succeed.

Happy Selling.

aquamarine and diamond ring
Item #s: 123821, 72145, 123530

Want to know how you can implement striking and colorful gemstones to your jewelry case? Check out one of our previous blogs for inspiration!

Explore These 6 Gemstone Selections for Colorful Engagement Rings




Sell With a Story: Black Opal

Sell with a Story October 2020
handful of black opal
Photo by Vincent Pardieu/GIA.

A sunset, tropical waters, watercolor paintings, Holi color clouds, the galaxy. You might be asking, “What do these have in common?”

If you have ever seen an opal, you likely already know. Considered one of the most colorful stones available within the industry, opals show many colors all in one wearable stone.

All About Black Opal

Moody and mysterious, black opals are fitting for an October birthstone. They have a dark body color with a gorgeous play of color that spans the spectrum. The benefit to a dark body color is that the colors pop off the darker background and scream at people to look at them.

Notable Gems Black Opal

The rarest and most valuable type of opal —  black opals —  are found at Lightning Ridge in New South Wales, Australia. No one really knows where Lightning Ridge got its name; however, allegedly a farmer, his trusty four-legged companion, and his flock of sheep were struck by lightning, aiding in the ridge getting its name.

Perhaps that’s fitting. Lightning Ridge black opals can be as dark as midnight with a play of color that’s akin to a night sky lit by bright flashes of lightning.

Technically Speaking

Opals have some technical words that are associated with them and them alone:

  • Play of color: The flashes of color you get when you rock and tilt the stone. This phenomenon is created by the internal structure interacting with light.
  • Body color: The background color, the palette in which all the colorful flashes lie.

At Stuller, we grade our calibrated gemstones based on the darkness of the body color. Gray body color will be graded as AA quality whereas a dark gray or black body results in AAA quality.

Calibrated Opal

Each black opal in Stuller Notable Gems™ is hand selected to represent the best features or a quality that’s unique to that stone, whether that’s body color, pattern, shape, or something else.

What Makes an Opal Valuable?

All other things equal, the play of color and the stone’s pattern determine an opal’s value.

Play of Color

A vibrant red opal has a more expensive price tag as it’s incredibly rare. The more red visible when you tilt and turn the stone, the more expensive the opal. Follow the spectrum backward for values: blue, at the opposite end of the spectrum, is the most common and therefore the least valuable; yellow, in the middle, is valued as such.

Play of color that is visible from one angle or only on part of the surface drops the value of the stone. The play of color should be spread across the whole stone, even if it changes in pattern type.

Notable Gems Opal

Pattern

It seems strange to think that the pattern of colors on a stone would aid in the value that it holds. However, when you think about it in terms of rarity, it makes more sense. There are three major types of patterns that hold sway on value, each represented by a corresponding look and rarity factor:

  • Pinfire: Very small patches or dots of spectral color.
  • Flash: Large areas of play of color.
  • Harlequin: Large, distinct, usually angular patches of play of color with touching edges.

Harlequin is quite rare, especially when you get a full range of colors, which makes it considerably more valuable. Pinfire is very common, making it less rare and therefore less valuable — even when the pinfire play of color is red.

Opals for October

The extraordinary shapes and unique ability to match and highlight any color makes black opal a go-to for designers wanting to create one-of-a-kind jewelry. The dark palette and eye-catching explosion of color make black opal a customer favorite for those keenly aware of the attention they will get — social media, here they come.

Notable Gems Black Opal

Try having a few loose in your store this month (it is the October birthstone, after all!), and it’s sure to lead to conversations about what black opals are, where they come from, and how customers can add one to their wish list.

At the very least, you get to have a lively, gemstone-positive conversation that can open the door for future questions. And your customers will think of you as the gemstone expert!

Happy selling!


Shop our selection of calibrated black opal cabochons, or discover a unique black opal in Stuller Notable Gems™




Sell With a Story: Fancy Colored Sapphires

Did you know that Sapphire comes in every color of the rainbow, except red? Every. Single. Color. Plus a few.

Multi-colored Sapphires

Fancy colored Sapphires are all the extraordinary colors outside of traditional blue, colorless, and black. Today, we are going to explore some of the up-and-coming colors as well as some of the most sought after.

Pantone 2019 Color of the Year Padparadscha Sapphire

First up is one of the rarest of the Sapphire family, Padparadscha. Pronounced pod-par-ah’d-sha, this gorgeous and subtle stone named after the reddish-yellow lotus flower is equally controversial as it is rare. Depending on who you speak to, the color defined to be a Pad (pronounced pod) can vary. Here at Stuller, we define this color as representing both pink and orange color within the stone and pale to medium in tone. If you look at the Sapphire and the first thing you think of is that it could have been plucked from a mesmerizing sunset or last night’s salmon dinner, it is likely a Pad. Trending because of the gorgeous color; paired with a pink gold mounting, these stunners can be any, from punk to princess, pink lover’s dream.

Dark Green Sapphires

Next up are cool tone Teal and Green Sapphires. These delicate colors are trending because of the unique and subtle color that packs an earthy punch. Coming from all over the world, teal and green stones can range from dark and broody with a surprising pop of color in the right light to faint, yet somehow bright, green. Stones coming from Montana in the US makes for a unique home-grown aesthetic. The draw to these sophisticated colors is how nicely they play with all metal colors and skin tones. The ethereal natural look lends them to delicate floral inspired mountings or minimalist designs that really let the stones shine.

Purple Sapphires

Purple Sapphires are a durable alternative to amethyst; rich and deep and powerful all rolled up into one easy to wear, durable stone. As a trending color, purple is alive with intensity. Since purple can come in many different shades from violet to reddish, select a cool tone stone to match your platinum mounting and a reddish stone for your yellow mountings to bring out the best in your Purple Sapphire. It’s not unusual for Purple Sapphires to be color change (or color shift in this instance; a sly change from purple to violet blue is what you would be seeing) stones, so make sure to take your stone outside to optimize its color. This is a great sales technique for your customers too if you have the ability to do it — and certainly if you know your customer well.   

Earth to Market Sapphires

Earth to Market Sapphires from Umba River Valley in Tanzania are one of my favorite fancy colored Sapphires right now. They feature a beautiful rich reddish cognac color with flashes of reds, oranges, yellows, browns, maroon, and even greens. This stone is the autumn leaves of New England embodied and are great for a customer that wants something photogenic with a great story. Our Earth to Market stones have known origins and the Sapphires are no exception.

Bicolor Sapphires, sometimes called Parti Sapphires, exhibit more than one color within the same stone. This colorful combination can be any match you can think but are more commonly found in the blue-green-yellow range or the pink-purple-blue range. Generally cut into shapes that are longer to show off a pronounced color line, bicolor Sapphires can come in many shapes and sizes. We have many bicolor Sapphires in our Notable Gems™ collection, including rose cuts and some unusual shapes.

We wrap up with a truly unusual fancy Sapphire, the Trapiche, which looks a little like a 6-spoke wheel with black, white, or grey growth pattern making the spokes and a greyish blue in-between. These unique cabochon or tablet cut stones can be special ordered through our Gemstone Special Orders Service in many different sizes and even as a matched pair for the customer who has everything and is ready for something curiously remarkable. 

I hope reading about some of the lessor known Sapphire colors encourages you to choose one for your next gemstone or bridal customer. They make a great option for a stone that is durable and easy for everyday wear and, of course, a fantastic way to showcase the uniqueness of each couple.

Multi-colored sapphires

Be sure to check out our entire selection of fancy colored sapphires for these beauties and more.

Happy Selling.




Sell With a Story: Imperial Topaz

Topaz crystals are impressive. Some of the largest specimens can weigh hundreds of pounds. The largest faceted stone in the world just happens to be a Topaz: The El-Dorado Topaz weighs in at 31,000 carats (13.6 pounds) and is currently housed in Spain.

Imperial topaz represents less than ½ of one percent of all top-grade topaz. Why, you ask? Because of the red or pinkish orange color found within. Imperial Topaz can be identified by the red cast all over the stone yielding the pinkish orange color or in a dynamic way at just the tips where you have an ombre blend of golden yellow to fiery red. For a particularly fine specimen, the golden color is in the center of the stone and blends to red at the tips. To see one is to understand the intensity and rarity of a stone. Yellow or Golden Topaz as well as Precious Topaz and Pink Topaz are beautiful in their own right but lack the telltale vibrancy of red, which makes them less valuable.

Imperial Topaz is frequently compared to the colors of a setting sun. Imperial Topaz, an 8 on the Mohs scale of hardness, is a good option for everyday wear. The color range that you get from Imperial Topaz lends itself to unique and personalized pieces of jewelry. The more red or vibrant pink they are, the more valuable and rarer they are. Adding to the popularity, the mostly eye-clean crystals can be found in almost every shape known, as well as unusual and fantasy cuts. Having large crystals leaves room for the imagination of what could be cut. And within the stone industry, there is no lack of imagination! A famous Imperial Topaz cut by Kreis in Germany and aptly named The Imperial Flame looks a bit like an elegant bottle of the highest quality champagne.

Value in such a fascinating stone is not only relative to its color, size, and rarity. In the case of Topaz, it’s also relative to its cutter. You read that right, its cutter. Topaz is not easy to cut — just the opposite. It can be a real challenge. Having a lapidary that can wrangle the rough material into a gorgeous, marketable gemstone is an art that few around the world have mastered. Having a reputable source for your stones can mean the difference in a stone that will last a lifetime and a stone that will chip and break easily.

Most Imperial Topaz available today comes from Minas Gerais, Brazil. This has been the source for the last two centuries. Prior to our sources today, the Ural Mountains in Russia produced some of the highest quality and most saturated specimens. Ownership of the highest quality material was limited to Royals.

Known to attract wealth and money and to bring good fortune to those in possession, Imperial Topaz is one of the most popular stones around the world. During the Renaissance, people felt that Imperial Topaz could dispel anger. With such vibrant and bold colors capturing attention and becoming the topic of conversation, I would not doubt it!

Happy Selling. Sam


Shop Imperial Topaz within the Stuller Notable Gems collection.

Or, if you’re looking for something more unique, our Special Order Gemstones team can help you find anything you need.