How to Use Hashtags on Social Media to Market Your Product

Do you remember when you used your first hashtag? For me, as a Gen Zer (or “Zoomer” as I much prefer it), hashtags were always part of my life on social media. In fact, I don’t remember a time where hashtags weren’t a thing. (Don’t lose all faith in me, though – I still know the term “pound sign”, despite probably being the last of the younger generation to know this.)

Anyway, if you aren’t on the hashtag train yet, you’re essentially missing out on free social media reach. So join me as I talk about why you need some hashtags in your life.

What is a hashtag?

Let’s start with some fun history. The hashtag was actually first used by Twitter user Chris Messina. Back in 2007, Chris offered the idea of using the pound sign as a way to group people/places/things together.

Little did Chris know this simple tweet shook how we search phrases on social media forever. Now, Merriam-Webster defines hashtag as “a word or phrase preceded by the symbol # that classifies or categorizes the accompanying text (such as a tweet)”. Pretty cool how one tweet changed the entirety of the social media landscape, right?

While hashtags can be used on Facebook, I believe they are more useful for your Instagram (and even Twitter) strategies. Let’s talk about why.

Why should I use hashtags?

Well, first and foremost, hashtags are an easy way to show your post to more people. Jewelry industry people, ESPECIALLY bridal/engagement businesses: I’m talking to you. Brides look to social media for inspiration about their weddings, which include their dream ring. With the modern bride emerging, I’ve found that #alternativebride is an effective hashtag to add to modern bridal designs, rings set with salt and pepper diamonds, etc. And that’s just one example. Don’t you want your posts to reach more people?

Stuller’s hashtag performance, gathered by Later

You can also use hashtags to conduct content research. For example, if you search “stackable rings” in the Instagram search, you can find top performing posts with that hashtag all in one place. This can inspire you to post things that are more similar to what you see under that tag, as those posts are likely performing very well.

Another good use of hashtags is for branding purposes. Urge your customers to use a branded hashtag for your business. For instance, Stuller’s branded hashtag is #HowIStuller, 302 Fine Jewelry’s hashtag is #302onYou, and ever&ever’s hashtag is #EverAndEverBride. Branded hashtags generate a buzz in your local community. Think about it: if one of your customers posts a BEAUTIFUL pair of earrings made by you and hashtags it, their friends may be more likely to see your other work from that hashtag, or even follow you!

Which hashtags should I use?

Typically, hashtags should be relevant to the content you’re posting. However, some hashtags are more popular than others. Instagram only allows up to 30 hashtags on one post, but I’m going to give you some resources that give you popular hashtags when your search one topic.

All-Hashtag

This site is extremely easy to use. All you have to do is enter a phrase (ex. “earrings”) and they give you 30 relevant, popular hashtags you can use on a photo of your earrings.

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Later

Later is a scheduling platform (that I recommend you all get on) that has free and cheap monthly subscriptions. With Later, you can use their “suggested hashtag” feature which acts pretty similarly to all-hashtag.com, except you can use this function WHILE scheduling your posts! Disclaimer: the hashtags are a bit different due to the differing algorithms both sites are using.

I cannot recommend Later enough, and their hashtag tool is just a bonus!

And there you have it! Are you ready to start using hashtags? Let me know in the comments below.


Interested in more tips on how to shine on social media? Check out these posts that will help you on your journey to becoming a social media guru in no time.

2020 Social Media Strategy in Three Easy Steps

Utilize Scheduling to Amp Up Your Social Media Strategy

Things You Need to Know: Social Media Dictionary




Things You Need to Know: Social Media Dictionary

Here’s some light reading for you before you prep for holiday: a “social media dictionary” with a breakdown of marketing terms and phrases that you may or may not have heard before.

I remember when I was still in school, someone used the word “copy” in front of me for the first time. Like, “Hannah, can you go edit that copy to better reflect the point of the Facebook post?” WHAT?! I thought a copy was just a duplicate of something. Boy, was I wrong.

Anyway, these terms can help you out in your social media discovery journey. I’m here to help you. This could be an infinitely long blog post, but I’ve narrowed it down to the most important words and phrases you’ll need to know!

Here are some social media/marketing terms that will help your future on social media!

Algorithm – a process or set of rules to be followed in calculations or other problem-solving operations, especially by a computer.

B2B – business-to-business (B2B) refers to commerce between two businesses rather than to commerce between a business and an individual consumer.

B2C – business-to-consumer (B2C) refers to commerce between a business and an individual consumer.

Blog – a regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or small group, that is written in an informal or conversational style.

Chat – the online exchange of messages in real time with one or more simultaneous users of a computer network e.g. Facebook Messenger, Snapchat, iMessage, etc.

Content – the information and experiences that are directed toward an end-user or audience (this would be your posts, statuses, etc).

Copy – anything written by you or your company which is meant to attract customers to your business.

Digital Marketing – the component of marketing that utilizes internet and online based digital technologies such as desktop computers, mobile phones and other digital media and platforms to promote products and services.

Digital Sales – the use of virtual channels to reach out to prospects, provide education, and ultimately offer a solution that uniquely meets their needs.

Direct Messages (DM) – a private form of communication between social media users that is only visible to the sender and recipient(s).

Engagement Rate – a metric that measures the level of engagement that a piece of created content (social media post) is receiving from an audience. It shows how much people interact with the content. Factors that influence engagement include users’ comments, shares, likes, and more.

Follower – someone who is tracking a particular person, group, organization, etc. on a social media website or application.

@stullerinc's social media Instagram follower count

Friend – someone who is connected to a user on a social media platform, usually on Facebook.

Handle – the term used to describe one’s username on social media networks, expressed with an “@” symbol: @stullerinc

Hashtag – a word or phrase preceded by a hash sign (#), used on social media websites and applications, especially Twitter, to identify messages on a specific topic (ex. #HowIStuller, #DiamondRing, #MetalFashion).

@stullerinc's social media hashtag usage

Impressions – a way for advertisers to keep track of the number of times an ad (or social media post) is shown.

Geotargeting – the practice of delivering content to a user based on his or her geographic location. (Tip: If you have a jewelry store in Lafayette, LA, you may not want to target people in Omaha, NE!)

Link Preview – an automatic feature that displays how links will appear once pasted into a post on social networks.

Live Streaming – the act of delivering video content on social media in real time.

Meme – rapidly shared photos or videos reflecting a relevant cultural symbol or social idea, generally meant to mimic or mock.

Mention – any social media post that mentions a person by their user name.

Newsfeed (or “feed”) – the post-login homepage for social networks that displays posts and status updates from people and pages a user is connected to.

Podcast – an audio file made available for streaming or download on a digital device.

PPC – pay-per-click (PPC) refers to a type of Internet advertising in which the advertiser pays the ad publisher when the ad is clicked. Used to drive traffic to websites.

Retargeting – an online marketing technique allowing marketers to display ads to people who have visited their websites or are part of their contact databases.

SEO – search engine optimization (SEO) refers to the process of optimizing web content so it can be indexed and found in popular search engines, such as Google, Bing, and Yahoo!

Selfie – a self-portrait typically taken using the front-facing camera of a digital photographing device, such as a smart phone, and usually shared on social media (bonus tip: did you know selfies showing off your product can produce higher engagement rates on your social channels?).

Social Media Monitoring – a routine observation of specific topics, conversations, and social media posts relevant to a business, person, or organization’s interests.

Subscribe – the action required to receive a particular user’s posts and other types of content on social media or websites.

Tagging – a special type of link connected directly to the tagged person’s page or profile, commonly used to identify social media users in photos.

@302FineJewelry social media Instagram tagging

The Cloud – an online data center, where users store and access information over the internet.

Troll – somebody who instigates negative activity on social media through their comments with the specific intention of provoking a reaction (Another bonus pro-tip: don’t engage with these people who are trolling your business!).

Unfollow – the act of ceasing to receive any further social media posts from a specific user.

UGC – User-generated content (UGC) is content such as photos, videos, blog posts, etc. created by users of digital media and shared on online platforms. Can include relevant hashtags. (We use #HowIStuller to track UGC!)

Viral – term used to describe photos, videos, or any other form of content circulated rapidly on the Internet.

Vlog – a blog post in video form, made popular by YouTube.

Webinar – an interactive web-based video and audio presentation, in which the host broadcasts the presentation to a group of people over the Internet. (Have you checked out our webinar series? Click here to learn more!)

@stullerinc's social media Facebook webinar


Whew, that’s a lot of terms. Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments below!




Self-Purchasers on Pinterest Social Media Blog Header

How to Target Self-Purchasers on Pinterest

You know, we spend a whole lot of time talking about millennials. We’re constantly pondering questions like: How do we reach them? What messages do we use to target millennials? How in the world do we get them to buy more diamonds?

By now, you’ve heard over and over that social media is the answer to all your millennial-related conundrums. And while this stands true, what if I told you there was another generation on social media with 75% more spending power?

Introducing Gen Xers: The self-purchasers on Pinterest who hold enormous buying power.

 

According to Pinsights for Businessa quarterly report distributed by the brilliant minds at Pinterest, Gen Xers not only have 75% more spending power than millennials, but they’re 23% more likely to indulge in luxuries when compared to non-Pinners. The data is there, so here are a few insights about this target audience and how to make the sale using Pinterest.

Self-Purchasers on Pinterest Social Media Jewelry

Who are these self-purchasers on Pinterest?

Often overlooked, Generation X is comprised of middle-aged adults, roughly 40-55 years in age. So let’s consider women in that age group— their children are older, perhaps even out of the house. They’ve established their careers, bringing stability and stronger purchasing power to the marketplace. These women are more inclined to gift themselves, especially with jewelry and other self-indulgences. They seek products that make them feel good, and luckily for you, jewelry is the perfect fit!

How to target self-purchasers on Pinterest:

1. Stay Ahead of the Trends

Pinterest is a place for planners. Users use the platform to curate boards for the next season of their lives. This means Pinterest is the perfect place to search for trend insight! Take note of high-performing pins in the jewelry space and try to pinpoint what makes them so engaging.  Start by taking the information you gain here and incorporate it into your own unique designs. Let these trends permeate the fashion styles you stock this holiday season.

2. Enable Rich Pins

I truly can’t stress this enough! Enable Rich Pins on your website as soon as possible. It’s a tool Pinterest gives us to make shopping through their platform easy, and we all should be taking advantage of it. All you (or your web developer) must do is install one small piece of code into your site. Rich Pins show metadata from your product pages right on the Pin itself, giving Pinners a richer experience and increasing engagement, clicks, and you guessed it . . . sales!

3. Turn Pinspiration into Reality

Do you customers walk in searching for something they found on Pinterest? Have you ever had to tell them you, unfortunately, don’t have what they want? Not anymore! Close that sale with a tool like CounterSketch. Build a piece inspired by the style they pinned right before their eyes and win them over on a custom design. If you’re interested, we walk you through from Pinterest to price in our free monthly solution sessions at Stuller.com/Webinars.

Self-purchasers on Pinterest social media computer tablet mobile

How do you leverage Pinterest in your business? Let us know in the comments below!