Gemstones for All: Five Gemstones for Men and Women

Brooches, Chains. Pendants. Rings. Gentlemen have a number of accessory options available and adding gemstones to fashion choices only allows for additional self-expression. Conventional wisdom would lead you to believe that gemstones are only features of women’s accessories and jewelry. But, times are changing, and developing trends would suggest otherwise. Gemstones do not belong to just women – or just men for that matter. Gemstones are for everyone.

New Fashion or Timeless Trend?

If you follow celebrities, influencers, and trendsetters, you’ll begin to notice what seems like a new fashion trend: gemstones! Gemstones are starting to make more of a statement for men as well – young and old – accenting rings, earrings, bracelets, necklaces, brooches, and more. But this androgynous trend is far from new. In fact, men from all backgrounds and from all over the world have been using gemstones in fashion throughout history dating back to the discovery of the earliest pieces of jewelry.

Gemstones have a rich history in fashion, each with their own story to tell. Let’s dive into five gemstones that make for excellent, powerful additions to men’s jewelry.

Ruby: Power and Boldness

Rubies Sell Story Blog Header

The color red symbolizes humanity’s strongest emotions of passion and fury. It is the color of our greatest desires, the blood that gives us life, and a symbol of battle. Such emotions and ideals are reflected in the energetic ruby. Ruby has been thought to provide all manner of virtues, such as vitality and invincibility in battle.

Often a favorite among gemstones historically, ruby is just as in demand today, with its value as prominent as ever. Ruby, a power move in fashion and bold choice in life, fits in well among unforgettable gold jewels. People are drawn to its color and the feeling of success and influence it brings.

Amethyst: Every Day is Regal

SWAS Amethyst Uses Blog Header

A bold and popular gemstone, amethyst has quite the history as a gemstone carrying great meaning. Due to its color, amethyst has been associated with the Greek god Dionysus (also known as Bacchus by the Romans), the god of wine. According to legend, amethyst was once connected to sobriety, sound mindedness, and protection. Because of this belief, warriors would make small cuts in their skin and place pieces of amethyst in the wound. The stones would inadvertently enter the bloodstream and as they blocked veins the warriors would seem vexed or drunk due to restricted blood flow. When the stones would dislodge, they were magically cured and attributed the “curing” to the power of the amethysts.

Throughout history, amethyst has been used to adorn royalty and religious figures. To this day you can still find amethyst as the chosen gemstone of bishops and even British royalty during the coronation. Amethyst is a noble symbol. Its color inspires power, boldness, and confidence.

Sapphire: Wear Your Style

SWAS Blue Sapphire Gemstones Header

Although they come in many shades and colors, the classic blue found in sapphires is one of the most distinguishable among gemstones in the world. From light and serene to dark and inky, there is a shade of blue for everyone. Truth, sincerity, and allegiance inspire those that choose to don sapphire. Sapphires can be found throughout history all over the world aiding in their steadfast following.

While most think of the iconic blue sapphire, these gemstones come in many colors and the options are endless. Each kind of sapphire is unique and worthy of appreciation, as are the people who wear them. Sapphire is noble and vibrant making it an excellent choice to accent stylings for all.

Emerald: Green with Envy

Emerald Gemstones Sell Story Header

Ambitious and lively, emerald’s notable green color is associated with opportunity and growth. Emerald is often connected to thriving landscapes, which ties in the virtues of relief and truth.

From Egypt and the Incan Empire to parts of Europe and Asia, the authority has a history of valuing the emerald. Emerald is a very calming, but powerful gemstone that makes for a great addition to anyone’s fashion statement.

Opal: Make a Statement

The magic of mystery strikes with the colors reflected in opal. Looking at opal, it is clearly not a traditional stone, but that does not detract from its intrigue. Historically, many have marveled at opal and found its colors inspiring. Others have associated it with the supernatural and the gift of prophecy.

Certainly unorthodox, opal’s rich kaleidoscope of colors is for those that wish to stand out and make an impression. Opal symbolizes hope and encouragement. Making a statement is the true magic this gemstone brings to the wearer.

Gemstones for All

Gemstones carry history and meaning. It is in this history you can see that they have a place with everyone. Man. Woman. Young. Old. Fashion and accessories are an expression of self and as time goes on jewelers will begin seeing more variety in those who are looking for ways to express those personal styles.

The gemstones mentioned only scratch the surface of stones used in modern fashion around the world. Other gemstones, such as tourmaline, garnet, and chrysoberyl, also make excellent gemstones for men and women. While Stuller may not carry every gemstone you might need, we are here to help you find exactly what you are looking for. You can special order gemstones through our network of sources.

Visit Stuller.com/specialorder to make a request.




Sell With a Story: Aquamarine

Aquamarine has long been considered a divisive stone; you either love them or love to hate them. With its unique color — non-replicable in nature — Aquamarine could be the enigma we all seek.

aquamarine
Shop Aquamarine in our Notable Gems™

Historical Background

Adopted as March’s birthstone in 1912, Aquamarine has had varied uses throughout the centuries. Two thousand years ago, Emperor Nero used thin slices of Aquamarine to aide in his poor vision. Fast forward to the 1450s. The Germans, famous for precision gemstone cutting, used thin slices to create the optics they needed to cut gems and developed the earliest eyeglasses. The Germans called ‘eyeglass/glasses’ die brille, and many thought this name came from the mineral beryl.

By 1550, the Spanish believed that Aquamarine directly related to the fountain of youth based on stories passed from the Egyptians on down to Ponce de Leon who happened to be a great storyteller. Perhaps it was because this gemstone has long been thought of as a stone of the sea, protecting sailors under Neptune’s watchful eye. No matter which fabled tale engages you, Aquamarine conjures great appreciation from many.

As a Beryl family member, which includes gorgeous green emeralds and pink morganites, Aquamarine comes in soft blue and greenish-blue shades. Categorized as a type 1 stone, most Aquamarine are eye-clean which is important because its tonality and saturation reveal even the smallest inclusions, lowering its value.

aquamarine
Shop Aquamarine in our calibrated offering

Heat-Treated vs. Non-Heat-Treated Aquamarine

Historically, the jewelry industry has two camps regarding the value of heat-treated Aquamarine — those believing the treatment lessens the stone’s value, and those who think it increases a stone’s value. Let’s explore both. 

First, it’s important to point out that most Aquamarine are heat-treated. It’s considerably more challenging to find un-treated stones, although a prolific hoard coming from Brazil will make it easier. These new stones have colors and clarities that need no help. 

Those who prefer a greenish aquamarine will generally find it in the “treated has less value” camp. Heating Aquamarine does not tend to change the color, but it minimizes impurities that cause the greenish hue, leaving behind a pure, crystal clear pastel blue. Those preferring this easy to identify blue believe that heating increases value. Neither camp is wrong; it merely reflects a difference of opinion. But identifying your camp will help you sell these subtle gemstones.

Selling Aquamarine

Letting a customer know that a stone is heated right up front, that it is an industry-wide practice and is irreversible, can help you gain credibility – not all jewelers disclose this treatment.  It also allows you to look and feel like the expert as you explain that removing stone impurities reduces the underlying greenish colors making the stone the much desired sky-blue.

The same holds true for letting a customer know that the Aquamarine they prefer is an unheated natural gem with its color just as the Earth produced it. It would not hurt to add that due to the rarity of un-heated stones (remember, heating is standard practice), a beautiful natural aquamarine’s value can go up. Also, explain what impurities exist in Aquamarine. Vanadium, one such impurity, has an intense teal color that not only increases the value but also can give the Aquamarine the passing look of a Paraiba, a color well suited to current trends.

The Value of Aquamarine

No matter the camp you reside in, understanding the why behind a gemstone’s value can help you sell in the way that makes the most sense for you and your associates.

If you need help understanding more about the stones we offer within Stuller Gemstones™, please reach out to our experts. We are happiest when helping you succeed.

Happy Selling.

aquamarine and diamond ring
Item #s: 123821, 72145, 123530


Want to know how you can implement striking and colorful gemstones to your jewelry case? Check out one of our previous blogs for inspiration!

Explore These 6 Gemstone Selections for Colorful Engagement Rings




Cursed Diamonds and Gemstones: All That Glitters Isn’t Gold

Last year, we covered gemstone superstitions — and that blog post has been trending online ever since. This year, just in time for the scariest day of the year, we’re going to dive into the fearsome folklore surrounding some (in)famous and cursed diamonds and gemstones.

Sinister Beauty: The Hope Diamond

No list of spooky stones is complete without the Hope Diamond. Known for its exceptional size, color, and history, the Hope Diamond is a hugely impressive stone.

Oh, and it’s cursed. Allegedly.

When Harry Winston donated the diamond to the Smithsonian Museum, many thought the country was doomed. Some individuals even urged President Eisenhower to reject the gift. How could such a remarkable diamond have such dark energy?

Well, it’s what Marie Antoinette was wearing when she was beheaded. And it was reportedly stolen from a statue of the Hindu goddess Sita. The origins of the curse vary, but people agree on one thing: that it is one cursed diamond. Take these examples of the rumored peril that has come to people who have been in possession of the Hope Diamond:

  • After stealing the diamond from Sita’s statue, the thief is said to have been killed by wild dogs.
  • Sultan Abdul Hamid of Turkey lost his throne.
  • Collector Philip Henry Hope’s family went broke, requiring the stone be sold to recoup losses, and his grandson died completely broke.
  • Evalyn Walsh McLean lost two of her children, and her husband was later committed to an asylum.

That’s just a sampling of tales, and while most are flat-out lies and the curse is exaggerated, who wants to take a chance? Best to leave it at the Smithsonian.

Men, Beware: The Koh-i-Noor

If you’re going to wear the 105.6-carat Koh-i-Noor Diamond, you better not be a man.

As the curse goes, “He who owns this diamond will own the world but will also know all its misfortunes. Only God or woman can wear it with impunity.” But those threatening words haven’t swayed people from wearing the Koh-i-Noor.

Believed to have been mined in India’s Kollur Mine in the twelfth century, the Koh-i-Noor has a long, bloody history. Here is but a sample of the misfortunes that have befallen the Koh-i-Noor’s owners:

  • Mughal emperor Babur lost his son to exile.
  • A later ruler, Shah Jahan, famous for building the Taj Mahal, spent the end of his days in prison — imprisoned by his own son, Aurangzeb.
  • Nadir Shah was assassinated.
  • Each of Nadir Shah’s successors were dethroned.

After centuries of poisonings, assassinations, civil wars, and invasions, the Koh-i-Noor eventually ended up with the British monarchy, where it sits today among the British Crown Jewels. However, this is not without controversy — the Indian government would like its diamond returned.

The Regent Diamond

The 140.64-carat Regent Diamond has a cruel, bloody history. Most known for decorating Napoleon Bonaparte’s sword, the Regent Diamond was stolen from India’s now-defunct Kollur Mine.

A slave hid the diamond in an open wound in his leg, then boarded a ship bound for Europe. The ship’s captain learned of the diamond and its whereabouts, so he murdered the slave. Afterward, the captain sold the diamond to an Indian merchant, and thus the curse began.

When the Crown Jewels of France were stolen in 1792, the Regent Diamond was among them. Napoleon got the stone in 1801, and Marie Antoinette had it later. And we all know what happened to her and Louis XVI.

Today, the Regent Diamond is displayed at the Louvre.

There are more cursed diamonds out there: the Sancy Diamond, the Taylor-Burton Diamond, and many more. But if you thought gemstones were safe, think again.

The Great Imposter: The Black Prince’s Ruby

Why impostor? Well, the Black Prince’s Ruby isn’t a ruby. Weighing in at a whopping 170 carats, it’s an irregularly cut cabochon spinel — and despite its impostor status, the Black Prince’s Ruby holds a position of high regard. Today, it’s set in the center of the Imperial State Crown of England.

Believed to have been mined in Badakhshan (today known as Tajikistan), the Black Prince’s Ruby first appears on record in the fourteenth century. Don Pedro the Cruel, ruler of Seville, Spain, plundered the gem from the Moors.

Then the Black Prince himself, Edward of Woodstock, had the stone, where it acquired its name. King Henry V had the gem next, having it set in his battle helmet beside real rubies, truly making this red spinel an impostor.

When King Charles I committed treason, he lost more than the stone, and the Black Prince’s Ruby passed from the British royal line to an unknown buyer. Charles II regained the stone later, but Colonel Thomas Blood nearly succeeded in stealing it during a 1671 heist.

The Delhi Purple Sapphire

The purported powers of sapphire include enlightenment, peace, and healing, yet devastation and despair have awaited all who’ve dared cross the Delhi Purple Sapphire.

Perhaps, that’s because there’s another impostor among us. But rather than a spinel masquerading as a ruby, this time, it’s an amethyst. No wonder the owners of the Delhi Purple Sapphire didn’t get to enjoy any of sapphire’s magical powers — they never had one to begin with!

Looted from the Temple of Indra during the Indian Mutiny of 1857, the Delhi Purple Sapphire is a gem allegedly cursed through thievery, by the Hindu god of war and weather. When the amethyst was taken from the temple, the ancient deity cast a curse upon the stone.

Afterward, the Delhi Purple Sapphire ended up in England, where it spelled trouble for all who owned it, from financial ruin to health problems galore, bad luck, and more.

Author Edward Heron-Allen sealed the gemstone inside a box and had it locked in a bank vault. Later, he gifted the stone to the Natural History Museum, with one stipulation: the box not be opened until three years after his death.

The Perilous Pearl: La Peregrina

La Peregrina, Spanish for “The Wanderer,” is a 50.56-carat pearl that originated from the Panama coastline in the sixteenth century. The then-administrator of the Panama colony gifted the pearl to Philip II, who subsequently gifted it to Queen Mary I of England.

Is Queen Mary I’s name familiar? If so, you may know her for her reign of terror that earned her the moniker Bloody Mary. She was rarely seen without La Peregrina — especially at executions. No doubt this pear-shaped pearl absorbed vile, violent energy.

The curse of La Peregrina is purported to be that of ruining the love lives of all who wear it:

  • King Philip II lived abroad for most of his marriage to Queen Mary I.
  • After Mary’s death, Philip proposed to her sister, who refused him.
  • Centuries later, Richard Burton purchased the stone for Elizabeth Taylor—who had seven marriages throughout her life. Richard was two of those.

As of 2011, La Peregrina belongs to an anonymous collector, who paid a whopping $11 million for the stone.

The Stolen Sapphire: The Star of India

As the world’s largest gem-quality blue star sapphire, the 563-carat Star of India is quite the coveted gemstone. So coveted, in fact, that on October 29, 1964, three thieves broke into the American Museum of Natural History in New York. They raided the gem hall, making off with millions of dollars’ worth of stolen gemstones — including the Star of India.

As the story goes, the display’s alarm batteries were dead. And the ill fortune went even further:

  • There was no security guard.
  • The windows were open.
  • The stone wasn’t even insured.

The thieves climbed in through the window and made off like the bandits they were.

Luckily, the Star of India was recovered not long after in the most unusual of places: a bus station locker in Miami, Florida. Not all the gemstones stolen with it were nearly as fortunate, however. Today, the Star of India is back at the American Museum of Natural History.

Hopefully, they’ve hired someone to regularly check the alarm system.

What’s the Verdict?

Are these stones truly cursed? We reached out to countless clairvoyants for confirmation, but they refuse to go on the record with a definitive answer.

But these tales do have some things in common: the stones were acquired through less-than-honorable means or have a bloody history. Perhaps, then, the curse is nothing more than a cautionary tale: don’t take what isn’t yours, and treat everyone with the kindness with which you want to be treated.

Certified Curse-Free Stones

We’re not daring enough to own any sinister stones — but we are daring enough to stock one of the industry’s largest diamond and gemstone selections. We offer more than 70 types of gemstones and diamonds in every size, shape, and color imaginable.

And don’t worry — we certify that all Stuller Diamonds™ and Stuller Gemstones™ were legitimately acquired and are thus curse free.


Enjoyed learning about the world’s most cursed diamonds and gemstones? Read our previous Halloween-themed posts regarding gemstone and jewelry superstitions.

5 Gemstone Superstitions and How to Use Them to Sell More Stones

6 Jewelry Superstitions and How to Use them to Your Advantage




Specialty Diamonds for Fashionistas

Amplify sophistication with chic, trendy specialty diamonds, the new darling of fashionistas and organic connoisseurs. Do these two groups agree on anything? Definitely — on these intriguing diamonds. Customers can choose from an array of conversation starters featuring distinctive colors, textures, and shapes. Many of these diamonds are rose cut, but you’ll also discover faceted stones.

Personality Plus

Customers want jewelry that expresses who they are. It can be subtle or bold, but it needs to reflect a value or feeling. Is it any wonder these distinctly different diamonds have captured their imagination? These customers embrace styles with personality. You can assure them that we hand select each specialty diamond. Then we give it an identifying number to emphasize each is one of a kind distinguished by its unique characteristics.

specialty diamonds

Salt & Pepper

These daring beauties turn the 4C’s upside down with a dramatic reinterpretation of color and inclusions. They are individually selected and desired for their beauty and uniqueness. Each salt and pepper diamond has hundreds if not thousands of inclusions that mix light and dark to create a distinctively textured appearance. The colors include misty gray, ash gray, and marbled gray, available in various shapes, including hexagons and kites — another way to achieve an individualized look.

salt and pepper specialty diamonds

Brown, Yellow, Green & Beyond

These unique specialty diamonds feature natural shadings and intriguing textures that result from their inclusions. Each stone has its own subtle, sophisticated color. The yellow diamonds range from light and golden yellow to brownish and opaque yellow. The brown specialty diamonds range from light brown and brownish-gray to orange and dark orange-brown. Our green specialty diamonds are a grayish-green.

specialty diamonds

Mesmerizing Color

Other diamonds in this selection come in highly prized colors, sizes, and shapes. Take a look at these blue cushion diamonds, which boast a startlingly gorgeous pale royal shade. Unusual shapes and sizes distinguish the specialty diamonds from our standard color-enhanced diamonds.                                        

opaque white specialty diamond
Opaque white diamond

Beyond White

The white specialty diamond has proven very popular. It goes beyond the colorless-near colorless range to reach an almost opalescent white with multi-colored inclusions. Irresistible? Absolutely.

Look Closely

Each specialty diamond is a natural work of art with colors, textures, and handcrafted shapes, unlike any other diamond. They feature different types and colors of inclusions making each uniquely beautiful. And each specialty diamond comes packaged in our popular gel boxes




Sell with a Story October 2020

Sell With a Story: Black Opal

handful of black opal
Photo by Vincent Pardieu/GIA.

A sunset, tropical waters, watercolor paintings, Holi color clouds, the galaxy. You might be asking, “What do these have in common?”

If you have ever seen an opal, you likely already know. Considered one of the most colorful stones available within the industry, opals show many colors all in one wearable stone.

All About Black Opal

Moody and mysterious, black opals are fitting for an October birthstone. They have a dark body color with a gorgeous play of color that spans the spectrum. The benefit to a dark body color is that the colors pop off the darker background and scream at people to look at them.

Notable Gems Black Opal

The rarest and most valuable type of opal —  black opals —  are found at Lightning Ridge in New South Wales, Australia. No one really knows where Lightning Ridge got its name; however, allegedly a farmer, his trusty four-legged companion, and his flock of sheep were struck by lightning, aiding in the ridge getting its name.

Perhaps that’s fitting. Lightning Ridge black opals can be as dark as midnight with a play of color that’s akin to a night sky lit by bright flashes of lightning.

Technically Speaking

Opals have some technical words that are associated with them and them alone:

  • Play of color: The flashes of color you get when you rock and tilt the stone. This phenomenon is created by the internal structure interacting with light.
  • Body color: The background color, the palette in which all the colorful flashes lie.

At Stuller, we grade our calibrated gemstones based on the darkness of the body color. Gray body color will be graded as AA quality whereas a dark gray or black body results in AAA quality.

Calibrated Opal

Each black opal in Stuller Notable Gems™ is hand selected to represent the best features or a quality that’s unique to that stone, whether that’s body color, pattern, shape, or something else.

What Makes an Opal Valuable?

All other things equal, the play of color and the stone’s pattern determine an opal’s value.

Play of Color

A vibrant red opal has a more expensive price tag as it’s incredibly rare. The more red visible when you tilt and turn the stone, the more expensive the opal. Follow the spectrum backward for values: blue, at the opposite end of the spectrum, is the most common and therefore the least valuable; yellow, in the middle, is valued as such.

Play of color that is visible from one angle or only on part of the surface drops the value of the stone. The play of color should be spread across the whole stone, even if it changes in pattern type.

Notable Gems Opal

Pattern

It seems strange to think that the pattern of colors on a stone would aid in the value that it holds. However, when you think about it in terms of rarity, it makes more sense. There are three major types of patterns that hold sway on value, each represented by a corresponding look and rarity factor:

  • Pinfire: Very small patches or dots of spectral color.
  • Flash: Large areas of play of color.
  • Harlequin: Large, distinct, usually angular patches of play of color with touching edges.

Harlequin is quite rare, especially when you get a full range of colors, which makes it considerably more valuable. Pinfire is very common, making it less rare and therefore less valuable — even when the pinfire play of color is red.

Opals for October

The extraordinary shapes and unique ability to match and highlight any color makes black opal a go-to for designers wanting to create one-of-a-kind jewelry. The dark palette and eye-catching explosion of color make black opal a customer favorite for those keenly aware of the attention they will get — social media, here they come.

Notable Gems Black Opal

Try having a few loose in your store this month (it is the October birthstone, after all!), and it’s sure to lead to conversations about what black opals are, where they come from, and how customers can add one to their wish list.

At the very least, you get to have a lively, gemstone-positive conversation that can open the door for future questions. And your customers will think of you as the gemstone expert!

Happy selling!


Shop our selection of calibrated black opal cabochons, or discover a unique black opal in Stuller Notable Gems™




Quick References Provided with New Diamonds & Gemstones Catalog

Earlier this month, we launched Diamonds and Gemstones 2020-2021, a 130-page catalog featuring Stuller’s comprehensive assortment of diamonds and gemstones. Visit our previous post to catch up on all the great highlights we have included in this latest edition.

Making this one of our most unique catalogs we have produced, the removable reference pages in the back of the book are ready to be used where you need them, when you need them. Including resources like a gemstone color wheel showcasing an assortment of complementary color possibilities, a poster showing best-selling round diamond and gemstone sizes and availability, and a variety of charts, tables, and information guides, this section of Diamonds and Gemstones 2020-2021 provides you with educational and reference material you can easily display in your store for both employees and customers. Explain industry concepts, such as the four C’s of diamonds or how stones are measured, to your customers or provide guides for your employees to refer back to on a regular basis with these easy-to-understand and illustrated resources.

Each of these reference pages are perforated for quick and clean removal from the catalog. If you prefer not to remove these pages, we’re happy to provide you with PDF copies of these pages for you to print for your personal use.

Click here to download your free Diamonds and Gemstones 2020-2021 reference pages.

From presenting the new additions to our Notable Gemstones™ and Stuller Diamonds® offerings to an updated visual aesthetic, Diamonds and Gemstones 2020-2021 provides you everything you need to quickly find what you are looking for in one of the industry’s widest selections. Visit our website for more information about the Diamonds and Gemstones 2020-2021 catalog.




All That Shimmers: Diamonds & Gemstones 2020-2021

Diamonds & Gemstones 2020-2021

As personalization continues to lead our industry, Diamonds & Gemstones 2020-2021 gives you all you need to quickly find that special stone within one of the industry’s widest selections. With 130 pages, this catalog features Stuller’s comprehensive assortment of diamonds and gemstones: beloved classics, on-trend favorites, and many new colorful options.

And in this latest installment, we’re doing things a bit differently.

Here are 5 cool updates in Diamonds & Gemstones 2020-2021

1. Beautiful New Look

This reimagined edition of our classic catalog is unlike anything we’ve ever done before. With its gorgeous new look, we’re sure you and your customers will love this catalog as much as we do. And, it will become your go-to resource for all things diamonds and gemstones.

2. New Products

Completely new to this catalog are Stuller Notable Gems™ and Stuller Diamonds® with grading reports. These two beautiful collections have their own chapter, setting the stage for a vast array of sparkling, stunning stones to come.

Dive in to discover a unique shape, cut, or color you may not have known we supply, such as fancy-color sapphires, multicolor tourmaline, salt-and-pepper diamonds, and so much more.

Diamonds & Gemstones specialty diamonds

3. Improved Navigation

We strive to make each new catalog better than the last, and this one is no exception.

You can look forward to a variety of navigational and other visual changes, starting with the beautiful, easily shoppable product pages and photography. From stone stock to services, you’ll discover everything you need within these six chapters.

Diamonds & Gemstones calibrated gemstones

4. Sourcing Map

Chapter six hosts a medley of cool and useful reference materials, and one of the things we’re most excited about is our sourcing map! You can see the global destinations our in-house experts visit to source only the best stones for you and your customers.

Diamonds & Gemstones sourcing map and color wheel

5. Gemstone Color Wheel

Our gemstone color wheel offers you a quick, at-a-glance comparison of various gemstones. With this handy reference, you can help your customers visualize the differences between gemstones of similar colors. Or, show them which colors would pair well.


The above is just a sampling of what awaits you in Diamonds & Gemstones 2020-2021. With discrete pricing, a references section that offers perforated pages, and captivating imagery, this catalog release is one of our most exciting of the year. And to build on that excitement, we’re running another catalog contest!

Color With Stuller

Show us your photo faves!

  1. From September 8 through October 9, 2020, take an image of your favorite photo from the new catalog.
  2. Submit that image to our Facebook or Instagram pages with the hashtags #HowIStuller and #ColorWithStuller. You can also email entries to Contest@Stuller.com.
  3. We will randomly select two winners to receive a $250 Stuller account credit toward the purchase of a diamond or gemstone!

Note: Winners must have a Stuller account in good standing and will be contacted via phone or email no later than October 14, 2020.


Flip through the pages in your copy, or browse the individual chapters online. You’ll be dazzled and delighted by what you unearth within!

Learn more about Diamonds and Gemstones 2020­-2021 on the Stuller website.




Sell With a Story: Fancy Colored Sapphires

Did you know that Sapphire comes in every color of the rainbow, except red? Every. Single. Color. Plus a few.

Multi-colored Sapphires

Fancy colored Sapphires are all the extraordinary colors outside of traditional blue, colorless, and black. Today, we are going to explore some of the up-and-coming colors as well as some of the most sought after.

Pantone 2019 Color of the Year Padparadscha Sapphire

First up is one of the rarest of the Sapphire family, Padparadscha. Pronounced pod-par-ah’d-sha, this gorgeous and subtle stone named after the reddish-yellow lotus flower is equally controversial as it is rare. Depending on who you speak to, the color defined to be a Pad (pronounced pod) can vary. Here at Stuller, we define this color as representing both pink and orange color within the stone and pale to medium in tone. If you look at the Sapphire and the first thing you think of is that it could have been plucked from a mesmerizing sunset or last night’s salmon dinner, it is likely a Pad. Trending because of the gorgeous color; paired with a pink gold mounting, these stunners can be any, from punk to princess, pink lover’s dream.

Dark Green Sapphires

Next up are cool tone Teal and Green Sapphires. These delicate colors are trending because of the unique and subtle color that packs an earthy punch. Coming from all over the world, teal and green stones can range from dark and broody with a surprising pop of color in the right light to faint, yet somehow bright, green. Stones coming from Montana in the US makes for a unique home-grown aesthetic. The draw to these sophisticated colors is how nicely they play with all metal colors and skin tones. The ethereal natural look lends them to delicate floral inspired mountings or minimalist designs that really let the stones shine.

Purple Sapphires

Purple Sapphires are a durable alternative to amethyst; rich and deep and powerful all rolled up into one easy to wear, durable stone. As a trending color, purple is alive with intensity. Since purple can come in many different shades from violet to reddish, select a cool tone stone to match your platinum mounting and a reddish stone for your yellow mountings to bring out the best in your Purple Sapphire. It’s not unusual for Purple Sapphires to be color change (or color shift in this instance; a sly change from purple to violet blue is what you would be seeing) stones, so make sure to take your stone outside to optimize its color. This is a great sales technique for your customers too if you have the ability to do it — and certainly if you know your customer well.   

Earth to Market Sapphires

Earth to Market Sapphires from Umba River Valley in Tanzania are one of my favorite fancy colored Sapphires right now. They feature a beautiful rich reddish cognac color with flashes of reds, oranges, yellows, browns, maroon, and even greens. This stone is the autumn leaves of New England embodied and are great for a customer that wants something photogenic with a great story. Our Earth to Market stones have known origins and the Sapphires are no exception.

Bicolor Sapphires, sometimes called Parti Sapphires, exhibit more than one color within the same stone. This colorful combination can be any match you can think but are more commonly found in the blue-green-yellow range or the pink-purple-blue range. Generally cut into shapes that are longer to show off a pronounced color line, bicolor Sapphires can come in many shapes and sizes. We have many bicolor Sapphires in our Notable Gems™ collection, including rose cuts and some unusual shapes.

We wrap up with a truly unusual fancy Sapphire, the Trapiche, which looks a little like a 6-spoke wheel with black, white, or grey growth pattern making the spokes and a greyish blue in-between. These unique cabochon or tablet cut stones can be special ordered through our Gemstone Special Orders Service in many different sizes and even as a matched pair for the customer who has everything and is ready for something curiously remarkable. 

I hope reading about some of the lessor known Sapphire colors encourages you to choose one for your next gemstone or bridal customer. They make a great option for a stone that is durable and easy for everyday wear and, of course, a fantastic way to showcase the uniqueness of each couple.

Multi-colored sapphires

Be sure to check out our entire selection of fancy colored sapphires for these beauties and more.

Happy Selling.




Sell With a Story: Imperial Topaz

Topaz crystals are impressive. Some of the largest specimens can weigh hundreds of pounds. The largest faceted stone in the world just happens to be a Topaz: The El-Dorado Topaz weighs in at 31,000 carats (13.6 pounds) and is currently housed in Spain.

Imperial topaz represents less than ½ of one percent of all top-grade topaz. Why, you ask? Because of the red or pinkish orange color found within. Imperial Topaz can be identified by the red cast all over the stone yielding the pinkish orange color or in a dynamic way at just the tips where you have an ombre blend of golden yellow to fiery red. For a particularly fine specimen, the golden color is in the center of the stone and blends to red at the tips. To see one is to understand the intensity and rarity of a stone. Yellow or Golden Topaz as well as Precious Topaz and Pink Topaz are beautiful in their own right but lack the telltale vibrancy of red, which makes them less valuable.

Imperial Topaz is frequently compared to the colors of a setting sun. Imperial Topaz, an 8 on the Mohs scale of hardness, is a good option for everyday wear. The color range that you get from Imperial Topaz lends itself to unique and personalized pieces of jewelry. The more red or vibrant pink they are, the more valuable and rarer they are. Adding to the popularity, the mostly eye-clean crystals can be found in almost every shape known, as well as unusual and fantasy cuts. Having large crystals leaves room for the imagination of what could be cut. And within the stone industry, there is no lack of imagination! A famous Imperial Topaz cut by Kreis in Germany and aptly named The Imperial Flame looks a bit like an elegant bottle of the highest quality champagne.

Value in such a fascinating stone is not only relative to its color, size, and rarity. In the case of Topaz, it’s also relative to its cutter. You read that right, its cutter. Topaz is not easy to cut — just the opposite. It can be a real challenge. Having a lapidary that can wrangle the rough material into a gorgeous, marketable gemstone is an art that few around the world have mastered. Having a reputable source for your stones can mean the difference in a stone that will last a lifetime and a stone that will chip and break easily.

Most Imperial Topaz available today comes from Minas Gerais, Brazil. This has been the source for the last two centuries. Prior to our sources today, the Ural Mountains in Russia produced some of the highest quality and most saturated specimens. Ownership of the highest quality material was limited to Royals.

Known to attract wealth and money and to bring good fortune to those in possession, Imperial Topaz is one of the most popular stones around the world. During the Renaissance, people felt that Imperial Topaz could dispel anger. With such vibrant and bold colors capturing attention and becoming the topic of conversation, I would not doubt it!

Happy Selling. Sam


Shop Imperial Topaz within the Stuller Notable Gems collection.

Or, if you’re looking for something more unique, our Special Order Gemstones team can help you find anything you need.




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Lab-Grown Diamonds: Let’s be completely clear, Part 1

As Lab-Grown Diamond (LGD) sales continue to grow with no end in sight, complete transparency — for you and us — has never been more important. None of us want to damage trust by selling a LGD as a Natural Diamond or a natural as a Lab-Grown diamond. LGDs are chemically, optically, and physically similar to Natural Diamonds, however they are created in a lab rather than 150 miles below the earth’s surface. LGDs have scintillating radiance, at a more attractive price. All customers need to know this.

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In this first blog on transparency, we’ll look at how we make sure you know you are buying an LGD from Stuller. And the second blog will discuss your responsibilities when selling a LGD or LGD-set jewelry.

The following steps mark the individual efforts Stuller takes to provide you with transparency in purchasing Lab-Grown Diamonds from us.

Buy from reputable partners

If we don’t know exactly what we’re buying and receiving, how can we give you that same assurance? We purchase our Lab-Grown Diamonds from reputable vendors with a proven track record, and they are required to screen their product before shipping it to us. We back this up by screening all colorless and near-colorless Diamonds that enter our facility.

Stuller has a strategic service arrangement with GIA (Gemological Institute of America®). As an independent entity from Stuller, located in our facility, it is staffed by GIA’s screening specialists, who use GIA’s proprietary technology to perform the work. GIA’s instruments screen round melee diamonds in sizes 0.005 CT through 0.24 CT. The technology also sorts and color grades (D-to-Z) natural diamonds into color ranges.  You can learn more in our Diamond Screening Guide.

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Labeling

When you shop on Stuller.com, Lab-Grown Diamonds have their own clearly marked categories to eliminate confusion. All loose LGDs and LGD set jewelry — online and in catalogs and brochures — have the LG badge in a particular blue color. And all product descriptions include “lab-grown diamond.” If you shop by phone, our Diamond Specialists specifically address Natural Diamonds vs. LGDs and explain the differences so you can share this information with your customers.

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Storage & Protocols

We store Lab-Grown Diamonds in separate vaults from our Natural Diamonds. And to avoid any possibility of mixing them, Diamond Specialists cannot have both types of diamonds on their desks at the same time.

Packaging & Invoices

We sell three levels of Lab-Grown Diamonds: large stones with a GCAL certificate or IGI report, large stones without reports, and melee. We store and ship the large LGDs with reports in a distinctive blue box that you can immediately identify as an LGD. The large stones without reports and the melee arrive wrapped in a blue paper nearly identical to the box color.

Your invoice will also state that you purchased one or more Lab-Grown Diamonds.

If you have any further questions about Lab-Grown Diamonds, call 800-877-7777, ext. 5 to speak with a Diamond Specialist.


Watch for the follow-up transparency blog later this month. It will address what and how you need to share LGD information when you sell them.